Tag Archives: identity

Relational masculinities: The fragility of modern gender categories

29 Jun

Relational MasculinitiesWhat does it mean to be a man? Is masculinity purely biological or is it shaped by social and relational factors? Can a man’s relationship with a romantic partner have the power to legitimize or conceivably challenge his gender identity?
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Call for Papers (NorMa – International Journal for Masculinity Studies)

19 Jan

Call for papers:

Special issue of NorMa – International Journal for Masculinity Studies, Vol. 10, no. 4, 2015.

MASCULINITY, WAR AND VIOLENCE

In this special issue we intend to address the relationship between masculinity, war and violence. We interpret this theme broadly and invite contributions that discuss gendered violence, military practice/s, resistance to war and violence from multilayered perspectives. Contributions may concern macro level phenomena such as public policies, debates and ideologies on war and terrorism, which may directly or indirectly reflect gendered discourses and specific notions of masculinity. Macro level issues may also include perceptions of national identity and questions of (re)making nations and national borders. Relevant topics at the meso level may focus on military organizations, peace and resistance movements, processes of radicalization, as well as collective narratives and memories of war, violence and resistance. At the micro level focus may be on processes of political identities and masculine subjectivities and positions such as warriors, victims, veterans and war criminals.

We would like contributions to relate to societal and transnational changes in the West as well as the Global South, and contributions should preferably include consideration of social and gendered inequalities. Finally we invite articles that analyze the relation between masculinity, war and violence based on a combination of theoretical development and empirical analysis.

We welcome submissions from different regions and disciplines that in one way or another further our understanding of how masculinity is co-constituted with war and violence.

Submit your 250 word abstract to Editor Ann-Dorte Christensen no later than January 30, 2015 at adc@socsci.aau.dk

Reviews with decisions on acceptance will be finished by February 16, 2015.

Full length papers (40-50,000 characters including references and bio) should be submitted by May 29, 2015.

Final paper early August; publication December 2015

Conflicting ideologies, converging identities: the masculinity-disability dilemma

28 Apr

Source: Wiki Media Commons

It’s been documented by both gender and disability scholars (see: Shuttleworth et al; Shuttleworth; Shakespeare; Gerschick and Miller) that masculinity and disability ideology conflict. To be clear, by disability ideology, I mean the medical view which pathologizes disability as a curative illness or defect of person and considers permanent or chronic limitations to function as misfortune and abnormality. Disability, in this view, is associated with fragile bodies and weak minds and persons with disabilities are assumed to be helpless and dependent. This should be distinguished from the social model which defines disability as a social-historical construction that is, at its core, grounded in fear and misunderstanding of difference, and becomes justification for ongoing material as well as attitudinal barriers to persons with impairments. Despite this being the dominant view held by the disability community at-large the medical model has permeated popular discourse and practice leading some scholars (see: Couser; Murphy; Mairs) to believe that disability, in this view, has the power to trump other identities like gender. In-effect, disability is assigned the position of Other and masculinity, autonomous, able-bodied, and strong-minded, is it’s opposite. Thus it follows, men with disabilities are perhaps confronted by an ultimate contradiction in status which beg important questions about subjectivity, the self and identity expression. My PhD dissertation (though in the early stages) explores these ideas from the perspective of blindness. This blog is the first of a two-part piece based on an interview I had with Will Reilly*, a young blind man living in NYC. Part one will focus on masculinity and disability and part two will introduce the significance of visual impairment, gender and contemporary (visual) culture. Continue reading

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