Some Men: Feminist Allies and the Movement to End Violence Against Women.

2 Mar

The International Conference on Masculinities is only a few days away! Today, we are excited to provide an excerpt from a new book by three featured speakers: You can hear Michael Messner, Max Greenberg and Tal Peretz on a featured panel on ‘Ally Tensions’ on Saturday March 7th, 11.15am in the Grand Ballroom. The following is an excerpt from their new book “Some Men: Feminist Allies and the Movement to End Violence Against Women”. The excerpt will also appear in the spring issue of VoiceMaleMagazine

Some Men

What does it mean for men to ally with women to stop gender-based violence?  This is the central question we tackle in our new book Some Men: Feminist Allies and the Movement to End Violence Against Women.  Based on life history interviews with 52 men anti-violence activists aged 22-70, and twelve women who work with these men, we explore the opportunities as well as the strains and tensions in men’s work to prevent sexual assault and domestic violence.

Continue reading

International Conference on Masculinities: The Program

24 Feb

CSMM_ICM2015

It’s finally here: The program for the International Conference on Masculinities: Engaging Men and Boys in Gender Equality. NYC, March 5th – 8th 2015.

Please download the program here.

And if you have not done so, register here for the conference.

We are looking forward to seeing you all in NYC.

#BlackGirlsMatter

16 Feb

We have reported previously on the specific challenges faced by male students of color in the education system and have pointed out some of the flaws in programs designed to help Black boys.

To add another dimension to this debate, we would like to point to a new report released by The African American Policy Forum. In this report the authors show that “girls of color face much harsher school discipline than their white peers but are excluded from current efforts to address the school-to-prison pipeline.”

To read the report, go to AAPF’s website and download it here.

You can also listen to an interview with one of the report’s authors, Prof. Kimberlé Crenshaw, director of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School and co-founder of the African-American Policy Forum, who was recently interviewed on FAIR‘s radio program Counterspin.

A Morning with the Men’s Group

9 Feb

I recently attended a meeting of a men’s group; in part to be a participant in a training session they were having, but also to meet some men that would hopefully be taking part in focus groups for my research.  The idea was to meet the men in an informal session and build rapport, so that they would feel more comfortable during the focus groups at a later date.

I didn’t really know what to expect of the men’s group meeting.  I knew one or two of the organisers of the event and I chatted with them as the men began to arrive, bustling about pouring coffee and tea while chewing on biscuits.  Although I shared the same hair colour as most of the men (well at least those that had it) I was significantly younger in years.  Worry crept into my head.  These men wouldn’t want to take part in my research I thought.  They wouldn’t understand what I was trying to achieve, or so my worries led me to believe.

[Please continue reading at the IrishSociologyBlog]

Life Cycles of Inequity: Do Black (Men’s) Lives Matter?

4 Feb

Colorlines has been running the fantastic series ‘Life Cycles of Inequity’, focusing on the life stages of Black men the US. The latest installment, produced by Kai Wright and Erin Zipper, focuses on health and mortality. First published at Colorlines.com on Jan 7 2015:

Inequity shows up in our lives in all kinds of places, but rarely can it been seen as starkly as when it presents itself in our bodies. Public health long ago established the relationship between poverty and illness. Today’s researchers are also closing in on the link between poor health and racism. The accumulated stressors of racial injustice appear to literally wear our bodies down. Perhaps no set of public health data makes this point more plainly than the statistical trends for life expectancy.

Continue reading

Finding Male-Oriented Solutions To The Problem Of Campus Rape And Sexual Assault

2 Feb

Our very own Cliff Cleek, PhD student at Stony Brook University and Program Director at the Center for the Study of Men & Masculinities, recently spoke on Wisconsin Public Radio about how to engage men in fighting sexual assault on college campuses.

You can listen to the interview here.

Call for Papers (NorMa – International Journal for Masculinity Studies)

19 Jan

Call for papers:

Special issue of NorMa – International Journal for Masculinity Studies, Vol. 10, no. 4, 2015.

MASCULINITY, WAR AND VIOLENCE

In this special issue we intend to address the relationship between masculinity, war and violence. We interpret this theme broadly and invite contributions that discuss gendered violence, military practice/s, resistance to war and violence from multilayered perspectives. Contributions may concern macro level phenomena such as public policies, debates and ideologies on war and terrorism, which may directly or indirectly reflect gendered discourses and specific notions of masculinity. Macro level issues may also include perceptions of national identity and questions of (re)making nations and national borders. Relevant topics at the meso level may focus on military organizations, peace and resistance movements, processes of radicalization, as well as collective narratives and memories of war, violence and resistance. At the micro level focus may be on processes of political identities and masculine subjectivities and positions such as warriors, victims, veterans and war criminals.

We would like contributions to relate to societal and transnational changes in the West as well as the Global South, and contributions should preferably include consideration of social and gendered inequalities. Finally we invite articles that analyze the relation between masculinity, war and violence based on a combination of theoretical development and empirical analysis.

We welcome submissions from different regions and disciplines that in one way or another further our understanding of how masculinity is co-constituted with war and violence.

Submit your 250 word abstract to Editor Ann-Dorte Christensen no later than January 30, 2015 at adc@socsci.aau.dk

Reviews with decisions on acceptance will be finished by February 16, 2015.

Full length papers (40-50,000 characters including references and bio) should be submitted by May 29, 2015.

Final paper early August; publication December 2015

John Jolie-Pitt’s gender and our fear of it

14 Jan

The internet has been abuzz with discussions of John Jolie-Pitt, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt’s eight-year-old child who hit the red carpet in a sharp suit at the premier of Unbroken on December 16. In the weeks since the premier multiple sources have reported that the child, who was designated female at birth and named Shiloh, now wishes to be called John and may identify as a boy. However, information on John is limited and no official statement has been released about his gender identity.

Continue reading

Are the Oregon Ducks the nation’s first “politically correct” football powerhouse?

9 Jan
Marcus Mariota running the ball against the Wyoming Cowboys (Source - Wikimedia Commons)

Marcus Mariota running the ball against the Wyoming Cowboys (Source – Wikimedia Commons)

This post was written by Michael Kimmel, Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University and founder of the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities.

Is Oregon the first Politically Correct football team?  And could such a team win a national championship?

Consider this: following their systematic, upbeat, and perfectly executed demolition of previously unbeaten Florida State in the national semi-finals last week, Oregon players were seen on the sidelines imitating FSU’s “Tomahawk Chop” and singing along to their equally disgusting “Indian War Chant” the phrase that rings out across the country around sexual assault: “No Means No.”

Excuse me?  Were these football players?  Good football players? Continue reading

National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference: bell hooks’ Keynote Speech

5 Jan source: http://www.nwsa.org/index.asp

Late in 2014, Cheryl and I represented the blog and the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities at the annual NWSA conference in Puerto Rico. The highlight of the several day event was the keynote speech given by feminist hero, bell hooks. (The entire speech can be found here.) In her talk, hooks discussed a variety of important topics: violence, male allies in feminism, the role of the academy, and the importance of love. Here, I’ll provide a brief overview.

Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,278 other followers

%d bloggers like this: