Archive by Author

Accountability and Men’s Role in Preventing Violence against Women

10 Mar
Source: Author's personal photo

Source: Author’s personal photo

BY NATASCHA YOGACHANDRA

On February 8th, I had the privilege of attending an event at the Brooklyn Museum entitled Mother Tongue: Monologues for Truth Bearing Women, For Emerging Songs and Other Keepers of the Flame. The three-hour-long performance brought together artists, activists and writers to engage in a conversation about violence against women in black communities. Nearly a dozen speakers shared stories of rape and abuse to an audience of a few hundred. They called out to their brothers in the room—those men who work to engage other men in eliminating gender violence. They didn’t wipe their tears but let them fall. The wrinkles in their palms deepened and darkened as they clenched their fists. They smiled wildly after each story of survival. Continue reading

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Week in Review: March 2-8, 2014

7 Mar

In the News

Psychologists at Purdue University find that men feel emasculated when doors are held open for them.

A Massachusetts court rules that a man who took an “upskirt” photo of a woman did not violate state law. In response, the Massachusetts legislature passes a ban on these voyeuristic photos.

The U.S. Senate is set to vote on legislation that will curb sexual assaults in the military. PBS reports that while the Pentagon opposes the bill, the majority of the senate supports it.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves Aveed, a testosterone enhancing pharmaceutical for aging men. While the drug may help aging men deal with fatigue and low libido, studies suggest that side effects include increased risk of heart disease.

 

Interesting Events/Reads

Today from 4-6pm, the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities will host a seminar with Svend Aage Madsen, a psychologist from the University of Coppenhagen, at Stony Brook University Manhattan campus.

On Saturday, March 7, from 5-7pm at Stony Brook University Manhattan campus, the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities will screen This is How I Roll, a documentary about men’s roller derby.

This week, John-Manuel Andriote writes about the relationship between gay men and their fathers in a Huffington Post blog.

Today, Lola Okolosie contemplates the constraints of masculinity on her son in this piece for the Guardian.

Taking the ‘care’ out of care work?: Men in nursing

20 Feb

Great post by Tristan Bridges in the Gender & Society blog! Visit the original post at: http://gendersociety.wordpress.com/2014/02/07/taking-the-care-out-of-care-work/

Gender & Society

Nurses and doctors have different kinds of work – but there’s a lot of overlap.  Yet, we still culturally associate the “doctoring” with masculinity and the “nursing” with femininity.  The distinction between “caring” and “curing” is a gendered one and it is part of what maintains existing occupational segregation in healthcare.  Indeed, research on occupational gender segregation finds that it persists less because we simply believe men are better than women (stronger, more competent, capable of more complex thinking, etc.) and more because of our beliefs that women and men simply have different natural interests and aptitudes.  This is why male nurses are the butt of so many jokes in our culture.  “Male nurse” sounds like an oxymoron (like “jumbo shrimp,” a “just war,” or my personal favorite, “graduate student”).  So, recruiting more men into nursing or more women into astrophysics is difficult work because it challenges a strong cultural…

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Homophobia, the Olympics, and the U.S.

12 Feb
Source: olympics.wikia.com

Source: olympics.wikia.com

Last week in the Masculinities 101 Week in Review, I posted an article from the Huffington Post which analyzed the potential enactment of the Russian legislation banning “gay propaganda” in Sochi.  With the continuation of the Olympics, scholars and activists invested in issues of gender and sexual equality remain skeptical about the choice of venue given Russia’s blatantly homophobic laws. I was intrigued to come across a video from the satirical “news” site, the Onion, (courtesy of two good friends) that reminded me that, on this issue, Russia shares a lot in common with the United States. While many were quick to throw Russia under the bus for their politics, homophobia remains a significant problem in the U.S., especially, though not exclusively, in the context of sports. Continue reading

Masculinities 101 Week in Review: February 7, 2014

7 Feb

The editors of Masculinities 101 decided that we would end the week by posting some relevant and current links to news sources, blogs, and other internet content. We hope this will spark your interest and give you something to think and talk about over the weekend!

Current Events:

Salon reports that this year’s Super Bowl commercials featured a “sensitive man,” showing flexibility in the boundaries of masculinity. (For analyses of Super Bowl commercials and hegemonic masculinity in years past, see this Sociological Images post).

The Seahawks won the Super Bowl, perhaps because of their commitment to yoga? This article explains how the team incorporated this traditionally “unmasculine” practice into the hypermasculine arena of football.

Olympic events begin in Sochi, Russia. This Huffington Post article reports on the potential enforcement of Russian laws banning “gay propaganda.”

George Zimmerman may fight DMX?

Interesting Reads:

Men and Masculinities publishes a new article analyzing self-injury among men (available Online First).

This commentary, written by Laurie Penny, reminds us that all men benefit from sexism.

A new study by UCLA, National Institutes of Health, and Consolidated Research finds that more men are taking testosterone to combat normal aging.

Black gay dads shock the internet by being normal.

The Wall Street Journal looks at the difference between “mom’s time” and “dad’s time.”

“Real Men Don’t Hurt Women”: Presidential Comments on Sexual Assault Prevention

27 Jan
whitehouse.gov

whitehouse.gov

This week, the President of the United States, Barack Obama, affirmed his commitment to issues of domestic and sexual abuse. In his weekly address to the nation, Obama announced the development of a White House task force to reduce the number of sexual assaults on college campuses. Current statistics reveal that 1 in 5 women will be the victims of sexual assault in college, a number that Obama calls “totally unacceptable.” The task force will help colleges prevent sexual assaults by providing examples of policies and protocols, measuring the success of existing and future programs, and suggesting resources to victims (for more on the goals and initiatives of the task force, see this White House memorandum). In addition to the work of the federal task force, Obama urged parents, especially fathers, to teach young men that “real men do not hurt women” and that they should be outraged by men who do. In other words, Obama has called out masculinity, implying its role in sexual assault and asking for a redefinition of what it means to be a man. Continue reading

Athletics and Masculinity: Allegations of Harassment in My Own Backyard

9 Dec

Several weeks ago, the editors of Masculinities 101, all graduate students at Stony Brook University, raised an eyebrow when we received a mass email from our university president, informing us that the director of the athletics department, Jim Fiore, was leaving his post and an interim director was taking his place. Within a few days, we became even more suspicious when a fellow graduate student sent around an article from the local newspaper, Newsday, stating that Fiore was not only leaving, but would be paid out his $800,000 contract. Later that week, no one was surprised when allegations of sexual harassment emerged as the primary reason for Fiore’s departure from Stony Brook University.

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Breaking News: Toys are Gendered

25 Nov

Every year, millions of people from the United States wake up extra early on the morning after Thanksgiving (or they never go to sleep) to buy gifts, electronics, toys, and other goods at a discounted price. Black Friday is a strange, but not at all surprising, practice indirectly commemorating the eradication of a population; this “holiday” celebrates genocide with discounted goods, unethical labor practices, and angry customer altercations over the latest Furby. Since Black Friday is upon us, retailers have been busy marketing the newest toys for the holiday season, giving those of us interested in gender and socialization an opportunity to evaluate the gendering of toys marketed to children.

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The Dad Code: Modern Fatherhood on Reality TV

11 Nov
Source: aetv.com

Source: aetv.com

Sixty years ago, a reality show about fatherhood would have been unthinkable and frankly pretty boring: dad wakes up, gets dressed, goes to work, comes home, kisses children on the forehead, eats dinner, watches tv, and goes to bed. Today, the same reality show would look quite different. Fathers are more involved in parenting than ever (see this Soc Images post on the historical trends of men’s parenting); we even observe dads who choose to stay at home (see Rochlen, Suizzo, McKelley, and Scaringi 2008 for more on stay-at-home dad’s experiences). Luckily, A&E has decided to entertain us with a new look at fatherhood by adding the reality show, Modern Dads, to their fall lineup.

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