The International Conference on Masculinities: Engaging Men and Boys, for Gender Equality

29 Jun

CSMM

This call for papers has been updated and the updated version may be found here.

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8 Responses to “The International Conference on Masculinities: Engaging Men and Boys, for Gender Equality”

  1. waykam June 29, 2014 at 10:33 pm #

    There can be no gender equality if it is that the concerns and interests of men and boys are not addressed. Its refreshing to finally see an international conference designed to engage the males of the specie in arriving at working solutions as both sexes work towards gender equality and parity.

  2. waykam June 29, 2014 at 10:35 pm #

    I wish I could be there-will there be any representatives from Jamaica

    • Amanda Kennedy June 29, 2014 at 11:49 pm #

      We’d love to have you! It is a bit early to tell, but we intend to have speakers from around the globe! If you know others who might be interested, please share this information with them. The best part of the conference is that it brings academics and activists together, hopefully to inspire better research and better activism.

  3. graffic July 9, 2014 at 3:48 pm #

    Somehow I don’t feel it is gender equality. There are topics affecting both men and women but it seems that this conference still handles those issues as “gendered” problems.

    Let me review the list

    – Supporting women’s reproductive health and rights. What about men? In a place where there is abortion and a woman can choose, a father cannot choose financial abortion and in some countries not even a paternity test to avoid paternity fraud.

    – Men’s violence against women. Like violence is a gendered problem. What about women’s violence against men? What about shelters for men? Why do you ignore violence against men? #ViolenceIsViolence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u3PgH86OyEM

    Also there are some things I believe I’ve never seen in a woman’s conference:

    – New approaches for work with women who use violence. Having more women than men taking care of children and beating them… I’d say that it should be a nice topic.

    – Best practices for campus programs for preventing sexual violence. I hope women can learn to stop being sexual violent too. Or are we ignoring sexual violence in women?

    – Understanding and challenging domestic abuse. Again domestic violence is not gendered.

    – Preventing gang rapes and mass-murders by boys and men. Correlation doesn’t mean causation, but it is nice to play with it.

    Do you see the double standard? Do you see the bigotry?

    My only hope is that at least this starts a dialog. In the end this is for the ones watching 🙂

    • Amanda Kennedy July 12, 2014 at 2:14 pm #

      It’s great to see people thinking about these things. We hope that this conference contributes to the broad project of gender equality in two significant ways. First, by addressing the toxic elements of conventional masculinities (this is clearly reflected in some of the issues–for example, violence against women, as well as men’s violence against other men…men are statistically much more likely to be involved as perpetrators of violent acts). Second, by helping elaborate, from a feminist perspective, how to improve men’s lives. For example, dealing with women’s reproductive rights also means encouraging men’s meaningful participation in both conception and procreation, not to mention parenting. So no double standards…jsut dealing with the gendered elements of our lives, trying to improve them at individual, interactional, and intitutional levels.

      • Doug Spoonwood September 17, 2014 at 12:01 am #

        “For example, dealing with women’s reproductive rights also means encouraging men’s meaningful participation in both conception and procreation, not to mention parenting. So no double standards”

        Women’s reproductive rights include abortion rights as well as opting out of parenthood via adoption. In other words, women’s reproductive rights includes the right to legal parental surrender. There isn’t anything about men’s rights to legal parental surrender implied here. That right almost surely will not get addressed by this group since they already stand convinced that women are primarily disadvantaged by gender inequality. I will note that with respect to men’s right to legal parental surrender now deceased President of the National Organization for Women did believe in this right…

        http://www.nytimes.com/1981/11/06/nyregion/paternity-suit-focuses-on-feminism-and-freedom.html

        So if this conference actually concerned gender equality in the area of reproductive rights, it would have to address not just legal maternal surrender, but also legal *paternal* surrender.

        The suggested double standard concerning rape also seems rather clear. There almost surely will not exist any talk of female perpetrators (even when the victims are other females), even though both the 2010 and the 2011 NISVS, as well as earlier studies, shows that they exist in surprising numbers. I will recommend Tamen’s blog http://tamenwrote.wordpress.com/2014/09/07/nisvs-2011-released-increased-male-victimization-and-rape-is-still-not-rape/ and the Toy Soldiers blog for further reading on this topic, as well as Phillip Cook and Tammy Hodo’s When Women Sexually Abuse Men: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0313397295/ref=asc_df_03133972953181412?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=pg-1583-86-20&linkCode=df0&creative=395097&creativeASIN=0313397295

        I agree that men are statistically more likely to come as the perpetrators of violence (though not aggression). That said, they are also statistically more likely to come as the victims of violence (this is an understatement). That men have gotten emphasized as the perpetrators instead of the as the victims shows that this conference almost surely will not have a focus on victims when discussing violence.

  4. Ulfar Bragason July 10, 2014 at 2:30 pm #

    deadline for proposals?

    • Amanda Kennedy July 12, 2014 at 2:09 pm #

      This is just the initial call to get the word out. We’ll have more details so please keep checking back.

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